Understanding change in cocktail recipes

January 12, 2010 | By | Add a Comment

It took me a while to agree with what is going on in the world of mixology today. I am a firm believer that anyone who takes the time to document a recipe and to actually put a name to it should at the very least have the say on whether or not the original recipe is changed. However, I am finding that even in the most trusted recipe books out there, that change seems to be accepted.
One thing that needs to be understood by every bartender is that it doesn’t matter how we feel a drink needs to be made. It is the customer consuming it that will have a final say in the matter. It doesn’t make a difference what we feel may be the correct way. We are there to serve the customer what they want, aren’t we?
We can mention to the customer that we have a way that they may enjoy better. However, you must take into consideration that we are only there to give customers complete satisfaction on what they’re asking for. So, it is our upmost duty as the server of these drinks to give the customer the upper hand when it comes to their decision on what their drink of choice is.
In regards to the changing of recipes, there are three drinks that come to mind. The Old Fashioned originally did not have soda added to the formulation. And I admit that it tastes much better without it, (my opinion of course). Another, the Long Island Iced Tea, originally did not have tequila in it. But if you look at bar books that date back to 1985, this somehow got added in. And the most destroyed one, the Sex on the Beach, seems to have several different recipes. Also, this drink was originally meant to be drank as a shooter, but now comes more frequently as a rocks drink.
Aside from all of this babble is something we need to keep in mind when serving the public. We must understand change and accept it. It’s alright to mention the way you know when serving someone who likes the new version of an old stand-by. But it is always the choice of the customer enjoying the beverage to make the decision on how they like their drink done.
All egos aside, we are their to be the pleaser for our patrons.

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Category: Bartending

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